Depression and Cognitive Behavioral Therapy

As one who has struggled for years with psychiatric disorders of various kinds, I find the inner-workings of the human brain remarkably fascinating. Of particular interest to me is the notion that retraining one’s thought processes can potentially alleviate, if not cure, such maladies as depression and obsessive-compulsive disorder — two illnesses I’ve battled to varying extents. Lately I’ve been thinking of the possibility that some of my issues arise from a kind of neural resource allocation in which certain overactive brain functions take up more energy than is necessary, thus draining the potential supply for other portions. This piece by Emily Anthes helps to confirm and explain such a possibility, while offering the comfort that maybe these problems aren’t necessarily permanent.

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2 comments

  1. There is some truth to this. Albert Ellis has a book called Rational Emotive Living that was helpful. Burns has another book out about Feeling Good Handbook. I don’t know. I think that I prefer books by Eckhart Tolle like Now. For me, the most helpful thing dealing with my demons has been working on staying in the present and focusing on breath.

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