Tolerance

Spare Me the Hate Crime Rubbish and Stop Blaming Conservatives

Left-wing ingrates over at the Huffington Post, and presumably everywhere else, are now telling us to hold our sympathies for the Orlando massacre victims. Evidently, conservatives are to blame, and Omar Mateen’s homicidal rage was merely (or mostly) the product of an Evangelical-influenced, homophobic culture. Hogwash. That this deluded claim has even been proffered just goes to show how far gone the LGBT community really is, and I fear that we’ve nearly lost a whole generation of them to this tortuous, intellectual violence.

The reason many haven’t called this tragedy a hate crime is quite simply because it is not yet clear that it was a hate crime at all. After all, how can we draw any serious conclusions without being given clear motives? The killer’s professed allegiance to ISIL strikes me as more disingenuous than authentic, and biographical reports from those who knew him suggest that the real cause in all of this was internally psychiatric, rather than externally psychological. To the extent that outside influences did play a role, it would appear that the enigmatic Miguel has more to say than all of the pundits combined: “this crazy, horrible thing he did was for revenge.” That Omar was a semi-closeted homosexual now looks to be beyond doubt, and it hardly seems reasonable to suppose that a gay man can demonstrate a hostile bias or “group animus” towards other gay men. Thus, we’re left with the story of a deranged and jilted lover who is no more guilty of a hate crime than Christina Grimmie’s shooter, Kevin James Loibl. The biggest difference: In an opportunistic turn of events, Mateen took advantage of his Muslim heritage and sought to identify himself with the largest Islamic group known for mass homicide.

Given the gay community’s persecution complex, however, it’s only natural that they are now seeking to pin the blame on a rival community whom they have lately come to despise for reasons which only betray their vast ignorance of religion, morality, history, and politics. More telling is their strange obsession with hate-oriented language, which, if the old, Freudian projection theories hold true, probably reveals more about them than it does of their opponents. Consequently, it would be their own inner demons that drive them with such vitriolic fervor to castigate, incriminate, and ultimately castrate any other group that might show signs of even the most benign disapproval. And conservative Christians are at fault? Spare me. Coming from a faction who still considers Matthew Shepard the poster child for LGBT victimization, this is hard to believe.

Should we choose to damn any party for the vile atrocity perpetrated in the Pulse nightclub, it seems far easier to lay the guilt upon those who have belligerently continued to fan the flames of social unrest and to construct straw men in an ill-founded effort to radically alter the nature of reality. If you declare war as enthusiastically, don’t be surprised at the collateral damage. But even this seems a stretch, and we have to admit that this was neither terrorism proper nor a typical crime of hate, at least insofar as Mateen was a part of the ostensibly hated group. It was the vengeful act of an emotionally disturbed lunatic that came about with very little outside prodding. Those of us who are level-headed enough to see this will continue to offer our sympathies, whether they’re appreciated or not.

Multiculturalism and America’s Broken Body

By the time it reached St. Paul, the metaphor of a body and its members had become a well-worn proverb. From its Aesopian origins to its later use by Menenius Agrippa, the essential theme had always been the same and still remains clear enough today: “a house divided . . .” to invoke the words of Jesus. And how could it be otherwise? It’s hard to believe that anyone could seriously question the theoretical basis of this statement, and yet the mass of multicultural fanatics seems bent on ignoring such a fundamental tenet of political theory. For sure, the old fable assumes a measure of diversity in its use of various limbs and organs, though never so much as to undermine the ultimate unity coming about through this diversity. E pluribus unum. Now, however, we have imbecilic leftists touting the virtues of their steroidal pluralism, striving not only to further the coexistence of various cultures and belief systems (an ideal as American as apple pie), but to convince the general populace that all of these cultures and belief systems are equally valid and true. Is it any wonder that Donald Trump has secured the Republican constituency?

Not a day goes by in which some version of this rancid filth doesn’t permeate the news outlets, usually with regard to gender identity or sexual orientation in some manner, though very often in relation to heritage and nationality: quite possibly the more dangerous of the two. Far from it being acceptable any longer simply to live and let these individuals exist in peace, standing equally before the law as they should, we’re progressively being forced into embracing their proclivities and worldviews as virtually no different from the more traditional values and frameworks which have so far defined this country. Leaving us with a mongrel bastard of their own peculiar ideology mixed with civil rights legislation, the philosophically-minded activists who ended up raping our college humanities departments have turned the political left away from all semblance of reason and have constructed a reality in which an infinite number of realities exists. Thus, it is not any more simply a matter of treating the human and his religion or ancestral customs with the dignity and impartiality they deserve in a free land, but a matter of coercing universal assent to those religions and customs with a stern caution that to do otherwise is “hateful.”

The problem with this radicalized relativism is that in the absence of a dominant culture society becomes little more than a weak confederation of only semi-unified groups that neither trust nor support each other, which isn’t far off from the well-publicized observations of Robert Putnam. But more to the point, when assimilation is discouraged, the people suffer and a country disintegrates. Shouldn’t this be obvious? Yet evidently it is too difficult for a large segment of our population to grasp, despite the tragic drama playing out before their own eyes. What’s worse is that they continue to spew forth their horrific nonsense by proposing more diversity training and more legal action in a misguided attempt at fostering unity when they are, in fact, doing nothing more than dislodging the very rational and Enlightened foundations on which the United States stands. Some have suggested that the collapse of America’s so-called “first city,” Cahokia came, not from environmental assaults or shortages of food, but from the internal strife which was a product of mass immigration and presumably a failure of these immigrants to acculturate themselves with Mississippian society. If such was our beginning, just imagine the end.

Freedom and Fear Are Strange and Secret Bedfellows Who Need a Divorce.

As a corollary to the supercilious bullshittery being peddled by the worst representatives of leftist politics is the tragic proposition by California’s Matthew McLaughlin not only to outlaw homosexual behavior, but to make it a crime punishable by death (via bullets, though it’s not clear if the traditional methods of stoning and burning are acceptable). From one point of view this latter suggestion would appear substantially worse than the gross intolerance demonstrated by mainstream LBGT advocates, as seen especially in the wake of Indiana’s RFRA debacle, yet the matter is nonetheless precisely the same in both cases, i.e. a totalitarian imposition of personal morality upon a vast and diverse population who should have every right to judge for themselves what ethical and religious beliefs they consider best.

It’s hard to imagine McLaughlin making any pretensions of inclusivity, since I suspect most of those embracing his form of theonomy care little for the classically liberal, Enlightenment-based political philosophy of the American way and would prefer instead to live in a Geneva-like utopia, complete with consistory and all just to make sure there’s not too much dancing in the streets. But semantics and persona aside, is there any real difference to the underlying thought processes that inform the polar ends of our ideological spectrum and the participants in modern policy debate? As I see it, one of the major driving forces behind the vitriol of both sides is an incessant and nagging fear, likely stemming from a primitive instinct to favor the group, which can, in turn, cause us to view outside individuals as inherently suspect and potentially dangerous to our own well-being. Beneficial though this may have been in our ancestral environment (and maybe even today in certain contexts), when applied to a world in which democracy reigns, the inevitable result is a sort of political tribalism that elevates identity and ideology over reason and logic, thereby engendering a measure of strife that can’t be assuaged by rationalization, but only by bloodbath and sheer disaster.